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on this, i think i'm a little to her left on a lot of thers foreign policy issues like iraq and the middle east. she's positioned herself just where you want to be, a notch or two to the right of obama on foreign policy, vis-a-vis netanyahu. she never took back her support for the iraq war. it seems to me she's notched pretty close to the model there politically, a good place to run against any republican. >> let's see about that because by that teary if you go all the way back to when the kts first made it to the national stage, bill clinton should have been the favorite of the republicans at the brought the democratic party away from the left and into the middle. instead, of course, you had the bill clinton years were just like the obama years. >> you see this happening again? swrooim saying they're going to find something. it's not always logical, not always about it's this issue -- >> let's get back to the visceral part. not just we're going to run against her because she could potentially be the democratic standard bearer but are we going to hate her? i agree with you -- rana this is
, speeches, which constit--constitute strong policy documents on the economy, on foreign policy, during the presidency, before the presidency and during the 1980 presidential campaign. some of that's in the book as well. c-span: by the way, i have one question. it does--you didn't cover it in any of the intros or anything. where are the tapes of the radio addresses? >> guest: that's a great question, and we have the tape here today. they're at the hoover institution archives. and this project could not have happened without both archives. the radio broadcasts, the handwritten versions, and all of the private papers are at the reagan library, although they are not controlled by the library. there's not a deed of gift. they are controlled by the reagans. they're private papers that happen to be housed there. so that's one place where reagan material is. the second place is the hoover institution, which controls the tapes. it was able to get hold of the tapes. harry o'connor was the producer of reagan's radio broadcasts. in fact, he was in hollywood at the time, in the '70s, and suggested
a look at politics and the year in foreign policy. we want to hear from you about your political hero. why he or she deserves the honor? your political hero of 2012. you can give us a call this morning. host: you can reach out on social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter.com/cspanwj. we have about 15 comment so far. you can send this e-mail that journal@c-span.org. your political hero for the first 45 minutes. here are some thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is from jonathan espinoza. about 15 comments on facebook already. danny likes bernie sanders. host: just some of the mansion's this morning. entions some of the mansi this morning. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independents. also on facebook, facebook.com/cspan. a couple of stories related to the fiscal cliff. from "thew bid frittle bit washington times." this is ron from louisiana. caller: good morning. host: who wish to nominate? -- who would you'll nominate? caller: obama. host: what makes him your hero? caller: we were on a major slide when he came
politically? would you put her where i put her on foreign policy to the right of obama? rana? >> i would. >> and safer politically for an election in a general election given the fact people normally want to switch parties every eight years. you don't want to run as a xerox of obama. your thoughts. >> i do think she's to the right on foreign policy. i think what's going to be really interesting is seeing where she is economically. she's been very savvy about using economic statecraft to advance foreign policy goals for the u.s. it will be interesting to see what she brings to the economic debate because i think that's still going to be a debate in the next election. jobs. how to grow, how to get the country back on track. it will be really interesting to see where it comes off. >> i have you as a feminist, everybody is a feminist right now. it's a good position to be in politically. do you think she will have an unusually high draw among women voters? and that's maybe a dumb question, but could she get up to 65% or 70% of the women voters as opposed to 55%. >> that would be a high number
in foreign policy. >> we stand adjourned. >> now the chairman of the senate foreign relations committee, he's been an unofficial envoy for president obama helping ease tension with president karzai in afghanistan and helping mend strained relations with pakistan after the killing of osama bin laden. >> we are strategic partners with a common enemy in terrorism and extremism. >> but kerry's not totally in sync with obama. he has supported limited military intervention in syria, something the president has resisted. over his 30-year career, kerry has built deep relationships with many foreign leaders. >> there are very few people in our country with greater experience over a longer period of time in foreign policy than senator kerry. >> perhaps kerry's biggest challenge to date is not his confirmation hearings on capitol hill, but rather following in hillary clinton's footsteps who has become one of the most popular officials in the obama cabinet both here and abroad. kate bolduan, cnn, washington. >>> 2012 was a wild year in sports from the giants winning the super bowl to the giants winning
and taking credit for it. two, any success in terms of any foreign policy in the middle east. >> the president said al-qaeda had been decimated. that was his foreign policy statement. on 9/11 there was a terrorist attack and u.s. ambassador in libya was killed. guess what? the media jumped on romney and said this is political. >> it was political. >> it changed from the obama campaign first. >> the attack that took place in libya what was going on in egypt and elsewhere where did video did prompt the attack. >> mitt romney said the obama campaign is not portraying this in the proper light. they have a weak response. guess what? we found out from that clip right there. the president didn't believe it was a terrorist attack on 9/11. >> i think you are hanging on a word, terrorists, extremists you. >> i think the president meant it was not a terrorist attack because they were watching the realtime attack happening. juan, you are repeating the spin tunisia and egypt and libya. they are separate. you have been putting a sequence within libya, too. >> lib with a comes after those a
foreign policy. she also named yun as her spokesperson. yun is vice president of the newspaper and television association. he studied at tokyo's ko university. puck is said to set up her administration this week. >>> russian president vladimir putin spends christmas eve in india, and he sees the chance to sign billions of dollars worth in trade and defense deals. putin met indian prime minister singh in new delhi. they agreed on a deal for india to purchase components of fighter jets to assemble. they also agreed to set up a $2 billion fund to set up joint trade and economic projects. they decided to add two nuclear reactors to southern india. but they reportedly failed to agree on terms of compensation in the event of an accident. >>> wrestling fans turned out for events in pakistan earlier this month that pitted some of japan's strongest men against each other. professional wrestling used to be popular in pakistan and thousands showed up for the exhibition matches. behind the scenes is a long history between a japanese wrestling giant and a legendary local family. verk has th
and in iran nuclear program continues to progress. look at the foreign policy challenges facing the united states in 2013. because youry wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it findone, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. aww man. [ male announcer ] returns are easy with free pickup from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ >> from iran's nuclear ambition toss china's nationalist im
japan's foreign policy. >> translator: we should rebuild our diplomacy to protect our national interests. we are facing many challenges in our relations with china, south can korea and even the united states on which japan's security is based. strengthening u.s./japan alliance is the first step towards rebuilding japan's diplomacy and security. >> abe promised his government would take the lead in rebuilding northeastern japan. he will achieve results as soon as possible to regain the trust of the japanese people. he said his cabinet is designed to overcome crisis. he was elected as prime minister, a post he held before between 2006 and 2007. he's the first politician in 64 years to return to the position after resigning. abe filled the cabinet with familiar faces and new ones. he appointed suga as chief cabinet secretary. that makes him the head government spokesperson. aso is his deputy. he will serve as finance minister and financial services minister. the new foreign minister is fumio kishida. he served in the previous cabinet. onodera is defense minister. he's well versed in dip ro
these jobs. foreign policy is my passion yet actually i'm also a mother. i want to be at home for the last five years that my children are at home. it was hard for me to admit that to myself. in the end i had to recognize, both as a matter of need and want, that my life was going to go in a different direction than i had always expected it would. i had to listen to that. i had to, in the end say, wow, maybe i'm not the same person i thought i was. i know this is the right thing for me to do. >> what was the most difficult part of your job in relation to balancing it with your role as a mother? >> it was just that sense so often where particularly my oldest son really needed me home, needed us both there. and i was in another place. i could not do anything about that. you know, i think that is true for millions of parents. certainly millions of women. i realize the stress was just overwhelming of knowing i had a child who really did need me and i couldn't respond. i couldn't live up to that responsibility. >> after you came to your decision you must have talked to secretary clinton. she's a
in the obama white house was these are republicans. on foreign policy, he's been way to the left of president obama. >>> former nebraska senator chuck hagel has been leaked not nominated leaked as a potential nominee for secretary of defense, and there was already a massive counter offensive against him. it does have more substance to it, than the attacks against susan rice. a fair amount of that substance consists of insinuations. the sides are forming, there's the chuck hagel defense corps and the club of very tree ole and assault. what is not happening is sitting back and asking the simple question, would this person make a better defense secretary than the alternatives who are the other people up for the job. would one of them be better? the front-runners for secretary of defense are chuck hagel. there's also michelle florinoid, who is well qualified. also in the running is ashton carter, the current deputy defense secretary. now, defense isn't my issue, but i'd like to know, which of these people would do the best job. we keep skipping the interview process, going right to the smearing p
the preoccupation of the committee and a preoccupation of the foreign policy and those concerned with foreign policy nationwide. why now? partly because this time we lost an ambassador and a great man. but mostly, it's because now benghazi isn't just a loss of diplomats, we have lost some before, but now there is a partisan advantage to be sought by one side or the other . this incident was an important, but is it more important than the north korean nuclear program? is it more important than the other subjects that haven't been the subject of so many hearings of this committee? we have now decided to focus on the politics security in part because we can blame one party or the other. we can blame the state department for not allocating its resources to diplomatic security or blame the republican congress for not appropriating the enough. we should do more for diplomatic security. this department should follow its own procedures, and we have not done so. we would like to believe in the world that is subject somehow to our control, that if we just do the right thing everything will turn out right. thi
a fascinating window into how foreign policy interest groups operate and has obscured the central question is hagel an ideal candidate to lead the department of defense and where is the department of defense going in the future. joining me is glenn greenwald, and we have the former senior adviser to the united nations tour on executions. spencer ackerman, the national security blog for the danger room and elise jordan who worked under condoleezza rice. i will admit, i did not realize chuck hagel was a polarizing figure until this whole thing went down. were you surprised by the reaction to hagel? >> in jewish day school we are taught that chuck hagel will come and drink our blood. so i guess it is not surprising, but the manufactured outrage of this has been just disgusting to see. you saw in a clip that you played, the audio clip, the very next thing he says discusses the contradictory and the counterproductive elements that advocates for israel often engage in, that seems they are now demonstrating right now. that hagel talks about the interest of israel. >> i think there's a strain in w
dollar. for some time now, overseas resources have been cut or withheld, and important foreign policy objectives have been starved. consider that last year we spent approximately $650 billion on our military. by contrast, the international affairs budget is less than one-tenth of the pentagon's. secretary gates has spoken about this and strongly urged the congress to address that imbalance. we have not yet. admiral mullen pointed out, the more diplomacy is cut, the more lives are lost. we have to make certain that we are not penny-wise and pound-foolish when it comes to supporting americas vital overseas interests. adequately funding foreign-policy initiatives is not spending, but investing in our long-term security, and more often or not, it saves far more expensive expenditures in dollars and lives in the conflicts that we fail to see or avoid. we need to invest in america's long-term interest in order to do the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world. this report makes that crystal clear. since 1985, i have had the privilege of making official journeys to one trouble spot or another.
implications for the foreign policy and wha in what is happen the middle east, john negroponte, the first director of national intelligence appointed by george w. bush serving five times as an investor and in his distinguished career in intelligence and diplomacy. great to have you with us. >> thank you. lou: let's start with the middle east. president morsi, ordering the military to arrest civilians. what is your reaction? >> i just think it is administration of the precariousness of the situation in egypt, but that situation is critical. we can't afford to see egypt go over some kind of a brink. they are crucial to the middle east peace process. wo perhaps if egypt were to pull back from the recognition of israel, the largest arab country population in the region, therev is a critical role to play in many different ways. lou: the way his administration has engaged the muslim brotherhood, the army and egypt and what the likely result will be, are you optimistic that his diplomacy is on the correct path? >> i think it started out quite seriously, nobody knew what was going to happen when
to be a foreign policy, naming a policy for him to the world's great deliberative body. >> you actually think that people are granted 2010 it got elected or the people ran before and it now ascended to positions of leadership believes that go with a solution or they were like that to not do things i supposed to do things? >> well, again, from a class of 2010 and our effort to the the 87 freshman, the so-called tea party class of the 112 congress, their belief is they are doing precisely what the people who elected them did, which is rolled back obama initiatives, cut spending. a lot that the debt ceiling should not be increased under a circumstances where they feel like i was a failure. but they basically believe their job is first to obstruct barack obama and once there is a republican president in place to pass this initiatives that create better business climate. more and more deregulation committee funding of programs that have never quite been near and dear to them. i think they do believe -- of course to fast-forward a bit about the debt ceiling fiasco of 2011, but after the summer we w
what is your source of power? after all she doesn't have any foreign-policy experience but she attends national security council meetings. she's often in the most important domestic meetings regarding the economy. no one gets to see the president without first going through valerie jarrett so what is this power that she has. the only explanation i can come up with after all these interviews i did was that she had given the first lady first lady and the president the impression that she had there back and she is protecting them from a hostile world if you will, a world in which people could come to see the president and make proposals that would not be to their liking. so for instance, when as an example, when the president wanted to do a mandate requiring religious institutions to provide free medical care, i'm sorry, health insurance for abortions and contraception, bill daily who was then the chief of staff, brad archbishop dolan from new york, the catholic archbishop who is now cardinal dolan, to speak to the president. valerie was obviously posted this mandate. when valerie jarrett
source of power? she doesn't have any foreign policy experience but she attends national security council meetings. she doesn't have any economic background but she is often in the most important domestic meetings regarding the economy. no one gets to see the president without going through valerie jarrett. what is this power she has? the only explanation i could come up with after all these interviews i did was that she has given the first lady and the president the impression that she has bareback, she is protecting them from a hostile world, if you will, all world in which people could come to see the president and make proposals that would not be to his liking. for instance, when as an example when the president wanted to do a mandate requiring religious institutions to provide free medical care, free health insurance for abortions and contraception, bill daley, the then chief of staff brought archbishop bowlen from new york, the catholic archbishop who is now cardinal to speak to the president. when valerie because she was obviously opposed to this mandate as a catholic, when valerie
cannot conduct effective negotiations with the united states when the foreign policy decisions of the federal governments are undermined by the individual policies of individual states. how do you respond to that? >> well, the federal government does legitimately have a monopoly on foreign relations and we haven't interfered with that, we haven't opened up embassies or consulates we're simply within the wonders in the states of arizona. they're disagreeing-- a foreign country disagrees with our laws on our state for illegal activity that therefore that becomes a matter of international relakeses and a federal court can then invalidate an otherwise invalid state law because a foreign country disagrees with it and if they think we're interfering with foreign relations, that's a very dangerous argument and i think it's important that the courts strike down that kind of argument. >> kelly: couldn't you also go to the argument, well, if you feel that our law is so tough and you have something else this minor aspect of sb-1070 which is what it's known as in arizona, then why do you c
obama's foreign policy is feckless and weak? >> i'm saying, you make your own decision. two years ago the middle east was a stable place, a government that was pro-american. they were not at war with israel. fast forward two years later, we have been very involved in toppling those dictators in the middle east but we have stepped back as those countries struggled to find new governments. they found islamist governments. we did not help them in pro democracy election. whether you talk about libya, vipt or any of the countries they were all a lot worse off than two years ago. i think the secretary of state has a lot to answer for and to explain why. what did do wrong to have the policies that have allowed the united states essentially to be blamed for most of the problems in the middle east today. >> gregg: the benghazi diplomatic mission was going to be a dangerous place. there had been previous attacks in and around it before the september 11th terror attack that killed four individuals. should we ask pretty direct questions about why you weren't protecting those people? >> yeah. what
at the peer review journal of foreign policy and the senior contributor to the. [indiscernible] which many of us, the first things we looked at in the morning. >> after? >> after. and a member of the court association of america. the clerk for the hon. warship berge john and barquette . and while a law student he was an editor from the yale law journal. i believe that is accredited. so as you can see, at two very talented. their debate is entitled to, detention policies. the way we set it up was we have -- in the book we will do it as live. steven will start and then will have great respond. >> great. thank you. it's a pleasure to be here. >> seven the fortitude to invite me to participate. i am a firm believer that the best they we can do as academics is raise the level debate. projects like this can only help in that regard with folks actually engaging with each other as opposed to talking past each other. let me offer couple of brief remarks that i lost a consistent with what i said in the book. i want to suggest that of all the myriad questions one could ask about the future of u.s. de
and the biggest trade deal in the last generation. the pivot to asia and other foreign policy. >> laura: going to do all this by eg executive decision becaue last time i checkle he still had a republican house. >> stop the extraordinary fiscal cliff negotiations and go back to regular order and pass a real budget and provide an alternative. >> laura: the democrats also might take that advice to pass a budget. >> stop the games and go back to committee process and let paul ryan do his job and have the big debate. >> let's go to you brad on this. i say this to my republican friends. though are all upset he will do executive fiat and rule making. elections have consequences the old cliche quicks in and it is clear that the president s aggressive and he will use every means at his dice posal and if republicans don't like it he will say make me stop or take me to court and the problem is in court we have very unpredictable judges and justices as we saw with the john roberts ruling on obama care and that relief often times is not going to be there or the damage will already have been done by the tim
's not forget foreign policy in the middle east. the arab spring continues to unfold in complicated and sometimes dangerous ways. syria essentially in a state of civil war. the muslim brotherhood has essentially taken power in egypt and also running the country along with the military. egypt is country in the balance. not clear whether they will be friend orono. and many segments on what happened in benghazi and libya and tragic story that led to susan rice missing her opportunity to be secretary of state and still republicans driving hard to get answers. last one for me greta and then i will stop talking. the fiscal cliff happening right now. what kind of government should we have and what sort of taxes and spending and who should pay what and end the year with a story about everything that touching scenion do with government that we have been arguing about since the start of the election. >> greta: let's have some fun stuff. linn sanity. >> i particularly enjoyed linn sanity. a wonderful story because he was a guy who came from out of no where who had been cut, released, overlooke
, these nonfiction titles were included in the foreign policy magazines must read books.
religion and politics. in 45 minutes, it looked at the biggest foreign policy events of 2012.
republican president of the united states. the league well within the mainstream of american foreign policy. the senate has to ratify it. it and 80 of them have said that they want the united states to ratify the treaty and join the league of nations under some conditions. 80 is well more than enough to make ratifications. >> they need two-thirds. >> 64 or -- ratification is not hard in the scenario. you have 80. you need 64 or 65. okay. the deal baker. they shouldn't be deal breaker. very few people view them as deal breaker. he knows wilson. and lodge says wilson, you know, he might accept reservation on the principle. we can get the ratification easily if you accept it. and wilson says i will never except the reservations. lodge at the reds elevation of the treaty. lodge is the republican. >> from the other party. >> that's right he's the republican the leader of the republican party in the senate. the most influential voice. >> the partisan break down. >> it's pretty closely split. there's a democratic i believe there's a democratic majority at this point. the key is 50eu6. it you canno
several nonfiction titles included in foreign policy magazine must read books. >> booktv is here at the annual national press club authors night and joining us now is author r. renshaw agree who has written a book called first cameraman. what is with the obama administration. >> is a videographer, sent in a carriage for a few years in the white house. the lifecycle did not work on the campaign formally or the white house power to the new and strange world of super pacs and independent expenditures. spectaculars about the campaign into destiny. as you get hooked up in a president? >> it is the right place, right time. a friend of mine was working at cnn as a documentary producer and has a more normal path into politics. i was not the first on anyone's list. she would knew i wanted to get involved in broadband and then i just hit it off with the senator and started traveling inside the bubble. >> how long did you do it? was a 24/7 for a while? >> you know, especially on the campaign, it really felt like 20 for seven. i was practically living in chicago when i was there too were thr
foreign policy debate for nearly 30 years and called on the senate to swiftly confirm his nomination. >>> we are waiting for word on the status of this man, the u.s. veteran jailed in mexico on weapons charges after declaring an antique shotgun at the border. his name is john hammer and his family said mexico's ambassador to the u.s. told him he will be released today. anderson, back to you. >> well, that's certainly good news. we talked to his family last week. they were hugely concerned so we'll be following that closely. susan, thanks. there are obviously going to be more funerals in newtown this weekend. another funeral just tomorrow as monsignor weiss is going to be officiating at. many difficult days ahead, but the families who lost loved ones are not alone. so many people around the world are offering support, sharing their pain, promising to remember the sandy hook victims. we'll be right back. this is a fire onouncer] that didn't destroy a home. this is a break-in that didn't devastate a family. this is the reason why -- adt. and while some companies may offer home security
in every major foreign policy debate for nearly 30 years and called on the senate to swiftly confirm his nomination. the u.s. marine veteran jailed in mexico on weapons charges is back in the u.s. tonight. his release comes from his mother. he was arrested four months ago after declaring an antique shotgun at the border. mexican authorities said the weapon did not comply with their gun laws. anderson. >> there are obviously going to be more funerals in newtown this weekend. another funeral just tomorrow as monsignor weiss is going to be officiating at. many difficult days ahead, but the families who lost loved ones are not alone. so many are promising to remember the sandy hook victims. we'll be right back. [ bells tolling ] >>> church bells on what was a raw and rainy december morning this morning. a reminder that life can change in an instant. horribly and forever. a reminder that little children, 6 and 7 years old, can be taken from their parents at a stranger's whim, that their spouses and girlfriends might go off to work and not come home. the lives stolen last friday can obviously
. war is obsolete. it cannot be used as a tool of our foreign policy. it's barbaric. someplace, somehow, people must come to that point and say, "i ain't gonna stay the war no more." amy goodman: have you talked to president obama about this? rep. john lewis: i have not had an opportunity. but i've spoken out on the floor of the house against the war in afghanistan, as i did against the war in iraq. amy goodman: you voted in-three days after september 11, 2001, to give president bush the authority to retaliate in a vote that was 420 to 1. you have described it was one of your toughest votes. talk about how you decided to do that. rep. john lewis: i was very disturbed about what happened on 9/11. and when i look back on it, if i had to do it all over again, i would have voted with barbara lee. it was raw courage on her part. so, because of that, i don't vote for funding for war. i vote against preparation for the military. i will never again go down that road. amy goodman: and what do you say to those who say, "then you're not supporting the military. you're not supporting the soldiers,
in the second term? >> hegel used on foreign policy, but he hasn't received a lot of criticism. how much of that is justified? i can't tell you. >> senator from vermont, we thank you for joining us the day after christmas. >> joining us to talk big picture and the president's second term cabinet, nbc editor mark murray was the december employee of the month. congratulations. >> excuse me. you heard from senator sanders saying the lack of urgency hasn't been a problem, but if you look at it for all intents and purposes, boehner removed himself from these discussions. harry reid, president obama, and a little bit of mitch mcconnell. what is possible of making a deal? >> the ball seems to be in mitch mcconnell's court. does he filibuster anything that harry reid ends up making with president obama? we have a paired down legislation extending for income below $250,000 and doing something with unemployment insurance that you were talking about? the question is a senate filibuster, democrats need 60 votes and republican votes, mcconnell ends up filibustering and will there be senators who supp
, the system is failing. we are seeing evidence of a fiscally and also in foreign policy and evidence of it domestically when you can see a surveillance state arising under the noses of both political parties and. >> you talk about your alliance with ron paul. both of you are leaving. this is your last days in congress, at least this time. so who are your successors, who you see in congress right now who will carry on these struggles for privacy, against drones? >> i would hope people i have worked with in the past like barbara lee, alan grayson and others would continue the efforts. there are people on both sides of the aisle which expressed concern. you have to remember we put together a very powerful coalition in challenging the war in libya that was a collision between democrats and republicans that reflects a new concern about where is america going? why are we letting the president or the white house determine that we should expand war? we don't even involve congress anymore. i think you are going to see continued efforts. the question is, the strength of it. and the question is
desires for fairness and justice with regard to our foreign policy, u.s. foreign- policy. i do find that my religious upbringing does -- is interwoven in however prison as. host: rich from tennessee. independent caller. caller: merry christmas, greta. host: good morning, merry christmas. caller: i echo the last caller. i would say my politics changed from republican to it independent. i voted the constitution party the last presidential election. but i found that most people who are serious voters do consider moral beliefs, our laws are based on morality. whether the source is a religion or their own sense of morality which they probably borrowed from other religions, how can you not consider morality and believes when you are voting? otherwise, you are simply pushing a lever based upon whims. to me it is a natural thing to consider religion and believes when -- beliefs when you are considering issues. whether the economy, health care, anything else. it is informed by what you have been taught, how you have been raised, how you feel about fairness and other things. host: does it mak
committee, john has played a major role in every foreign policy debate in years. he understands we have to harness all elements of american power and ensure they are working together. diplomatic developments, economic and political and military and intelligence as well as the power of our values which inspires so many people around the world. as john as said, we're an exceptional nation not because we say we are but because we do exceptional things. i would say one of the things we have seen is when john helped lead the way along with folks likes john mccain to restore our -- to vietnam. it sent a powerful message to congress. over the years john has earned the respect and confidence of leaders around the world. he is not going to need a lot of on-the-job training. he has arned the respect and trust of his colleagues, democrats and republicans. i think it's fair to say that few individuals know as many presidents, prime ministers or grasp our foreign policies as firmly as john kerry and this makes him a perfect choice guide american diplomacy in the years ahead. >> "washington journal"
god bless you and god bless america. [applause] >> tomorrow morning a look at foreign policy in 2012. then the biggest political stories of 2012 with fox news political analyst juan williams. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors an
journal." a look at the biggest foreign policy events of 2012, our guest is ely lake of news week and the daily beast. then the biggest political stories of 2012. we'll look at that with juan williams. "washington journal" starts every morning at 7 eastern on c-span. >> as we wait for this pro forma session to get under way, some information about programming happening the day after christmas. c-span spoke with two retiring lawmakers, congressman dan burton and senator kent conrad. mr. burton, an indiana republican, served in congress for 30 years, and in the 1990s chaired the house oversight committee. senator conrad, the north dakota democrat, has been in office for 20 years and chairs the senate budget committee. our interview with congressman burton is at 8 p.m. wednesday night and senator conrad follows at 8:30. the presiding officer: the senate will come to order. the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, december 24, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint th
. the foreign policy was that significant, and its domestic ramifications were that significant. jefferson was terrified that the british were coming back. the good thing about this argument is they did, so you win. you win the argument. the war of 1812 happened. and so we had to have a ratifying conflict which jefferson always suspected. and i think was, in some ways, the inevitable result of the unlikely victory we won in the first place, this odd coastal republic that managed to defeat the world's greatest empire. jefferson wanted us to see him as a, see himself as a defender and parent of this revolution in the sense of the great thinker, the great arcticlator of the principles of republican liberty. and he was that. but he was also an awfully good vote getter and deal cutter. and i think that's okay because, as jefferson himself said, it is best to give as well as to take in a system like ours. and without mutual concessions, the republic itself would crack and crumble and be vulnerable to the kind of reaction, the kind of returning monarchy and mono-- monoaround kim -- we didn't say
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